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Inside Five: Rennie Peters on her ascent, mental health, LoveJuice & more

Rennie is one of the fastest rising names out of London and belongs to one of the capital’s best-known event & label brands – LoveJuice.

Inside Five: Rennie Peters on her ascent, mental health, LoveJuice & more
Image: Press

In recent articles, we have delved into issues around the mental health aspects of being an artist in the modern-day musical arena. Today, we sit down with someone who adds an exponential amount of value to the subject as we dive into the world of an upcoming artist making all the right moves in the industry.

Rennie Peters has been making industry leaps with verve and tempo. This has seen her career elevate meteorically.

The LoveJuice mainstay and INLV label manager exuberates confidence on the outside and plays the ‘model professional’ role to perfection. 

Rennie has the unique etiquette and coolness blend required to advance through the ranks and has wonderfully crafted a career through the idealistic ingredients needed to bake the DJ cake. With a host of high profile bookings already under her belt, the hype surrounding her journey is super-juiced.

Rennie flaunts an online presence of ‘effortlessly cool’ and punches through barriers with her infectious and bouncy sound style. This has enabled her story to offer an unlimited amount of potential.

Welcome to Mr. Afterparty Rennie! Your journey is one that many DJs will relate to. It epitomises the work ethos that the modern-day artist will undertake. For our readers, can you give an outline of your story to date and your views on what is needed in this social media led day and age to become a successful artist?

It’s a bit of a weird story, to be honest. Working in the industry and DJing has always been a dream of mine but had always procrastinated it due to a lack of time and money to devote to learning. 

I entered a competition on Charlie Tee’s Instagram to win a mini controller, and like with all things like this, I just kind of forgot about it. I then lost my job due to Covid, so was lounging around doing nothing during the first lockdown and got a message one afternoon to say I had won the competition… I didn’t have an excuse anymore! I truly believe it was the universe working its magic after years of dreaming about it. 

From then, I just grafted every day, doing live streams from my bedroom and garden, pirate studios the lot. Then when we were allowed to reopen pubs and restaurants, my now boss George Mensah gave me a call to come and play at Love Pub + Grub.. I guess from then the rest is history. 

Although Social Media plays such a huge part in getting your name out there nowadays, I still believe you cannot beat networking. I’ve been going to raves almost every weekend since I was 17, and a lot of my first gigs were from friends who I had met at these raves. I guess for me, it worked like a domino effect after that. 

Read More Humans or robots? A look at the human side of the DJ life | Mr. Afterparty (mrafterparty.com)

We write about the importance of having a defined strategy as a DJ to elevate the hobby into a career. What would you suggest has been the biggest challenge in your climb, and any advice to an upcoming DJ setting out in the industry? 

There are so many things I could talk about here, but it all comes down to the mental struggle. I was always worried about what music to play, what people thought of me if I made a mistake etc.. It’s only really now 2 years in that I’m just accepting that it’s okay to mess up, realising what music I really enjoy discovering and playing and that the most important people are the ones on the dance floor. 

I guess my advice would be to just enjoy yourself. Do not let the outside pressures ruin your experience. Don’t worry about anything else other than perfecting what you do, there are going to be people who love you, and there are going to be people that don’t, and that is absolutely ok. I wish I started to understand this sooner. 

We know the pressures extremities placed on a DJ and the effects it can have on mental health, confidence and everyday life. I know you will not mind us speaking about your battle with confidence elements built from the unwarranted pressure. Can you share your experiences and what you have learnt?

I’ve always been quite open with my emotions and struggles because I know so many people go through the same stuff. It’s not a secret that the music industry is incredibly toxic and not for the faint-hearted. Since my first gig I have felt this immense pressure to constantly be perfect, but in reality that is just not possible, in any sense. 

If my set did not go absolutely perfectly, or if the room quietened a little bit when I came on, or the crowd didn’t react how I hoped, all of a sudden this dark cloud of thoughts would come over me and the whole experience is ruined. This would happen every weekend and still happens sometimes now. 

What’s really helped me is having people around me that I can talk to. 

Luckily lots of my friends are in the music industry themselves and are able to give advice based on experience. I have actually found that so many people experience the same things, which is really reassuring. Having a good circle of people around is so important, but it’s also important to have people who are honest with you, people who tell you when you made a mistake but also help you to learn from it. Although sometimes it can be a hard pill to swallow, there is no use in being told what you want to hear. 

What are your views on artist management and(or) having a mentor/team to help guide you on the physically and mentally challenging journey? 

Absolutely. I think this is so important, but unfortunately, not everyone has access to someone like this. I’ve been really lucky to have a few friends within the industry, but also to work with George and Sammy (LoveJuice founders) who I can always turn to for advice on anything that comes my way. There are a lot of people in the industry that try to take the piss, and if you’re not that clued up on what happens in the industry you can get caught amongst all of that. It’s so easy to get carried away, and wrapped up in things, especially with the industry being so political. I definitely think I would be totally f****d without my best friend and the boys. They have really helped me to keep my head above water. 

I really do owe a lot to LoveJuice. George & Sammy have not only given me the most amazing opportunities as a DJ but on the business side of the industry as well. It’s coming up to 2 years with them helping with the events, labels, admin and customer service side of things and I’ve learnt so much. Playing for LoveJuice has opened so many doors for me – the first time I played for Dance on Arrival was George got me on a B2B with him in Kent, and I’ve played every Dance on Arrival since. I truly feel that everything has happened in a domino effect. 

Do you feel that being a female artist making your way in a more male-dominated space has presented you with challenges that male artists may not face? 

I personally haven’t experienced any challenges as such. However, I have had comments from people like “oh you’re only getting these bookings because you’re a girl” or “yeah it’s because you look good”. What is the need? Just like you, I’ve been booked by the promoter because they want me to play at their event. I hope that it’s not because I’m a girl. That should be irrelevant. Book people because they know how to work for a crowd and make people dance. That is what this is all about.

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